Yakovlev Yak-141

Soviet vertical takeoff / landing (VTOL) fighter aircraft

Russia Navy Yak 141 NATO Codename Freestyle
photo: Wal Nelowkin

The Yakovlev Yak-141 also called the Yak-41 is designed and manufactured by the Yakovlev design bureau as a supersonic vertical takeoff/landing (VTOL) fighter aircraft primarily used by the Soviet Navy. The aircraft was used for testing and initially flew on March 9, 1987. It was canceled in August 1991.

Manufacturer:
Yakovlev
Country:
Russia
Manufactured:
1987 to: 1991
ICAO:
Y141
Price:

Specifications

Avionics:
Doppler radar, laser-TV ranging and aiming, HUD
Engine:
1x Soyuz R-79V-300 and 2 x RKBM RD-41 turbojets (9400 lbf each)
turbofan
Power:
34,000 pound-force
Max Cruise Speed:
971 knots
1,798 Km/h
Approach Speed (Vref):
Travel range:
1,100 Nautical Miles
2,037 Kilometers
Fuel Economy:
Service Ceiling:
50,900 feet
Rate of Climb:
49000 feet / minute
248.92metre / second
Take Off Distance:
Landing Distance:
Max Take Off Weight:
19,500 Kg
42,990 lbs
Max Landing Weight:
Max Payload:
2,600 Kg
5,732 lbs
Fuel Tank Capacity:
1,616 gallon
6,117 litre
Baggage Volume:
Seats - Economy / General:
1 seats
Seats - Business Class:
Seats - First Class:
Cabin Height:
Cabin Width:
Cabin Length:
Exterior Length:
18.36 metre - 60.24 feet
Tail height:
5 metre - 16.40 feet
Fuselage Diameter:
1 metre - 3.28 feet
Wing Span / Rotor Diameter:
10.1 metre - 33.14 feet
Wing Tips:
no winglets
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Description

On March 9, 1987, the prototype designated as 48-2 took to the air for the first time from Zhukovsky International Airport. It was operated by chief test pilot Sinitsyn. On December 29, 1989, the prototype 48-3 took to the sky for its first hovering flight. It was the same prototype used on June 13, 1990, to perform the first entire transition from vertical to high-speed flight and vertical landing.

During its testing, the Yak-41 showcased outstanding combat maneuvers. The Yak-41 set numerous world-class records under the fictitious name Yak-141. The designation Yak-141 has been widely known to Western allies.

The Yak-41 has an external length of 18.36 meters, an external height of 3 meters, a tail height of 5 meters, and a fuselage diameter of 1 meter. It has a wheelbase of 6.9 meters, a wingspan of 10.10 meters, and a wing area of 31.7 square meters.

The aircraft has an empty weight of 11,650 kg, a maximum takeoff weight of 19,500 kg, a maximum payload of 2,600 kg, and a fuel tank capacity of 1,616 US gallons. It is powered by a single Soyuz R-79V-300 and two RKBM RD-41 engines.

The Soyuz R-79V-300 is an afterburning vectoring-nozzle turbofan engine which produces a maximum dry thrust of 24,000 lbf and an afterburning thrust of 34,000 lbf. The RKBM RD-41 is a turbojet engine with a 9,400 lbf thrust each.

The Yak-41 has a maximum speed of 970 knots and a travel range of 1,100 nautical miles. The ferry range is 1,600 nautical miles. It can fly up to 50,900 feet and can climb at a rate of 49,000 feet per minute.

The aircraft can be loaded with a 1×30 mm GSh-30-1 autocannon with 120 rounds and four hardpoints; four located underwing and one in the fuselage with a capacity of 2,600 kg of external stores with provisions to bear combinations of R-73 Archer short-range, R-77 Adder medium-range active radar homing, or R-27 Alamo medium to long-range air-to-air missiles.