How Fast (& How Far) Can A Learjet Travel?

You may be considering traveling by private jet rather than commercial plane flight and wonder how comparable the travel speeds are to one another. A Learjet is not the fastest jet, but it does travel within the middle of the range of jet speeds. How fast do the different models of Learjet go?

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So How Fast Does A Learjet Go?

In general, a private jet travels between 400 to 711 miles per hour (mph) while the most popular models of Learjet travel at between 515 to 562 mph.

That means that traveling in its slowest model airplane, a Learjet could transport you from New York City, NY to Los Angeles, CA in 4.75 hours’ time. Depending on the model of jet you choose, you could travel with six to ten business associates or friends.

Learjet Models and their Top Speed

The term Learjet refers to a line of private jets by Bombardier and the speed of its planes within those parameters varies by plane model. Founded in 1962, in Wichita, Kansas, Learjet produced six distinct aircraft models before Bombardier Aircraft acquired it in 1990.

Since that time, one new Learjet model debuted, the Liberty 75. Typically, Learjet numbered its models. Each model can travel at a different top speed although the top speeds fall within a very close range.

Learjet Liberty 75

Bombardier Learjet 75 Liberty
Bombardier Learjet 75 Liberty

The latest model in the Learjet family, the Liberty 75, can travel at MACH 0.81, also expressed as 860 km/h, 464 knot-speed or about 534 mph while carrying a full payload including seven individuals. 

Learjet 23

Learjet 23
Learjet 23

Introduced in 1962 with a maiden flight on October 7, 1963, the Learjet 23 can travel at MACH 0.82, also expressed as 904.82 km/h, 488 knot-speed or about 562 mph while carrying a full payload including six individuals.

Learjet 24

Learjet 24
Learjet 24

Introduced in 1966 with a maiden flight on January 24, 1966, the Learjet 24 can travel at MACH 0.86, also expressed as 877.09 km/h, 473 knot-speed or about 545 mph while carrying a full payload including six individuals.

Learjet 25

Learjet 25 of NASA

Introduced in 1967 with a maiden flight on November 1, 1967, the Learjet 23 can travel at MACH 0.81, also expressed as 859 km/h, 464 knot-speed or about 534 mph while carrying a full payload including eight individuals.

Learjet 28

Learjet 28-29
Learjet 28-29

Introduced in 1977 with a maiden flight on August 24, 1977, the Learjet 28 can travel at MACH 0.71, also expressed as 884 km/h, 477 knot-speed or about 549 mph while carrying a full payload including eight to ten individuals.

Learjet 31

Learjet 31
Learjet 31

Introduced in 1990 with a maiden flight on May 11, 1987, the Learjet 31 can travel at MACH 0.81, also expressed as 829 km/h, 448 knot-speed or about 515 mph while carrying a full payload including ten individuals.

Learjet 35

Learjet 35
Learjet 35

Introduced in 1973 with a maiden flight on August 22, 1973, the Learjet 23 can travel at MACH 0.83, also expressed as 872 km/h, 471 knot-speed or about 542 mph while carrying a full payload including eight individuals.

This plane is also known as a US Air Force C21. A subset of this model of airplane is Learjet 36 which uses the same essential design except it shortens the plane by 18 inches and added a larger fuel tank so it could travel 500 miles further.

Learjet 40

Learjet 40
Learjet 40

Introduced in 2004 with a maiden flight on August 31, 2002, the Learjet 40 can travel at MACH 0.81, also expressed as 865 km/h, 464 knot-speed or about 534 mph while carrying a full payload including ten individuals.

 How far can a Learjet fly on a tank of gas? 

Not only will you get there faster in a Learjet, you will get there non-stop. A commercial Boeing 747 has a cruising speed of 500 miles per hour, but Learjets typically travel at about 540 mph.

They also have large gas tanks that allow storage of more than 700 gallons of gas which allows for a travel of 1,767 miles with a 45 minute reserve. These large tanks mean that no re-fueling stop is needed. 

The other element of this is the fact that private jets have less wait time on the ground, from check-in to takeoff, making for a faster experience overall. Learjet models typically have similar designs and no engine in the Learjet family has the ability to exceed Mach 1, the speed of sound.

While the Learjet firm manufactured more than ten total models of plane, some did not remain in production very long. This article highlights its classic models that remain in use as well as its newest model, manufactured after its acquisition by and merger with Bombardier.

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